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Humanities

Humanities

‘Nobody cares how much you know, until they know how much you care.’ – Theodore Roosevelt

Whether this is about the world around us or events in the past that have shaped our lives and our government, here at Shuttleworth College our Humanities curriculums aim to encourage creativity, critical thinking and foster curiosity so that students do care about their past, present and future.

Introduction

“I’ve learnt more about the world and about the past and I’ve had learning experiences outside the classroom.  I really enjoy learning about natural disasters and about why the world and society is the way it is.  History and Geography have given more meaning to things that I see on the news and hopefully we can learn from events that have happened in the past.” – Charlie Budgen, Humanities Ambassador

KS3 Geography

‘Geography is a living, breathing subject, constantly adapting itself to change. It is dynamic and relevant. For me geography is a great adventure with a purpose.’ – Michael Palin

What will I study?

Geography aims to promote an appreciation and understanding of the world through a vibrant curriculum. There is a balance between human and physical topics in each year group, which seek to emphasise the power and wonder of the natural world as well as the significance of the built surroundings, the economy and political decisions in creating a diverse environment.

Topics are studied on a variety of scales to enhance students’ understanding of the local area and the UK, as well as countries around the world, from which comparisons can be drawn. We aim to promote a diverse range of skills, from map reading, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and source work to literacy and data handling.

Year 7 topics:

  • Tourism
  • Ecosystems
  • Rivers & Coasts
  • Resources & Energy
  • Weather & Climate

 Year 8 topics:

  • Population & Development
  • Restless Earth
  • Urban Environments
  • Industry
  • Rocks & Ice

The key British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect for and tolerance of others are woven into Geography in both Key Stages. In Geography, students often compare our society to other societies around the world and draw comparisons, for example when comparing China’s ‘one child’ policy to the liberties we enjoy, or when considering how we treat migrants and asylum seekers with the respect they deserve.  Social, moral, spiritual and cultural themes pervade the curriculum, through examining our own values, appreciating the views of others, working collaboratively and learning more about other parts of the world.

How will I be assessed?

There are two assessments associated with each unit of work – one mid-unit test, and one end of unit assessment.  You will be given a band for each assessment you do so that you can track your progress throughout the year.  You will be given feedback for each assessment so that you know what you did well, as well as helping you to understand how you might develop and improve your understanding and skills for future assessments.

Your exercise book will be marked regularly so that your teacher can make sure you are also progressing during lessons.  Your spelling, punctuation and grammar will be marked, ensuring you have life-long literacy skills.  Peer and self-assessment are also used in lessons to help you to understand how to make reasoned judgements about the quality of work you produce.  Understanding this enables you to consider what good quality work looks like as you produce it.

How can I stretch my learning?

The best way to understand geography is to experience it – who doesn’t enjoy a day out or a holiday?  By getting out and about in your local area you will spot key geographical processes taking place in front of you.  Why not take a walk along the banks of the river Calder or Wyre, spotting meanders and flood risk?  Or, spend an afternoon in Blackpool evaluating the sea wall and considering the impact that tourism has on the built environment.  Even a simple walk through Burnley town centre can help you to think about how traffic problems could be resolved.

You should also try to watch television differently.  You could tune in to some of the amazing documentaries that are produced, showing the farthest corners of the world, or delve into national issues or global injustices.  Particularly good examples are Planet Earth and Unreported World.  Equally, you might watch some of your favourite television shows from the perspective of a geographer – for example you may consider issues relating to urban areas while watching Coronation Street!

Good literacy skills are key to every students’ success.  By reading any sort of literature you will not only understand the value of good punctuation and grammar, but your vocabulary will be extended.  This will help you to express yourself more fluently, and you will be better able to structure your ideas.  Some good geography books include the Horrible Geography series.

 

Useful links

BBC Bitesize (KS3) http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zrw76sg

Geography All The Way (KS3) http://www.geographyalltheway.com/ks3_geography.htm

Internet Geography (KS3) http://geography.learnontheinternet.co.uk/ks3/index.html

KS3 History

‘The more you know about the past, the better prepared you are for the future.’ – Theodore Roosevelt

 What will I study?

During KS3 you will extend and deepen your knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, so that it provides a well-informed context for wider learning. You will be taught to identify significant events, make connections, draw contrasts, and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time.

Our historical studies begin in 1066 and from that point cover a breadth of social, political, economic and religious themes leading up to and including events of the Twentieth Century. You will be encouraged to develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past and to investigate them critically using a range of sources in their historical context.

Crucially, you will be taught to recognise that your historical knowledge, understanding and skills help you to understand the present and also provide you with a basis for your role as a responsible citizen.

Year 7

Course Content Assessments.
An introduction to key historical skills

·         chronology and using evidence

Church, state and society in Medieval Britain 1066-1509.

·         the Norman Conquest

·         the struggle between Church and crown

·         the Black Death and its social and economic impact

The development of church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745

·         the Elizabethan religious settlement and conflict with Catholics (including Scotland, Spain and Ireland)

·         the causes and events of the civil wars throughout Britain

·         the Interregnum (including Cromwell in Ireland)

·    Baseline test

Focusing on knowledge and understanding of historical skills.

·    Why did William win the Battle of Hastings?

·    What was life like in a Medieval Town? 

·    Mary Queen of Scots, a mystery…

·    Was Oliver Cromwell a hero or villain?

·    Summer exam

 

Year 8

Course Content Assessments.
Political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901

·         Britain’s transatlantic slave trade, its effects and its eventual abolition

·         Britain as the first industrial nation – the impact on society

·         party politics, extension of the franchise and social reform

·         women’s suffrage

The challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day. 

·         the First World War and the Peace Settlement

·         the Second World War and the Holocaust

·    To what extent did life improve for African Americans after the abolition of slavery?

·    Emily Davidson, a mystery…

·    What was trench life like?

·    Why was the 1st July 1916 a disaster for the British Army?

·    What was life like in the Warsaw Ghettos?

·    Summer exam – Was the dropping of the atomic bomb in 1945 a necessary evil?

 

The KS3 History curriculum at Shuttleworth College allows you to focus on social, moral, spiritual and cultural (SMSC) issues and informs your fundamental understanding of British values of democracy and the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed each half term to ensure progress against expected outcomes. The assessments listed above are designed to test your historical knowledge and conceptual understanding such as that of change and continuity and cause and consequence. Alongside this, key historical skills are continually assessed to ensure that you are supported in your development of source evaluation and analysis.

Written feedback will be given after each assessment and there will be time for you to make a difference to your work so that you are able to reflect on your learning needs and improve in future assessments.

Self and peer assessment are important aspects of assessment for learning practice within History. Assessing your own work or that of others can help you develop your understanding of the learning objectives and success criteria. Research has shown that you make more progress when you are actively involved in your own learning and assessment.

Finally, your classwork and homework will be marked regularly with particular focus on spelling, punctuation and grammar to develop literacy skills and allow you to explain and analyse historical events effectively and articulately.

How can I stretch my learning?

Here are our top three suggestions!

  1. Learning about the past is really learning about people. What more interesting thing is there than learning about people’s lives and gaining valuable life lessons from them? Talk to people around you about their experiences of historical events; these eyewitness accounts provide historians with some of the most valuable information that we have about the past.
  1. Take the opportunity to visit museums and if you can, handle artefacts. Most museums are free and are not stuffy, dusty places! We have local museums dedicated to the Industrial Revolution, the Lancashire Fusiliers, the Tudors and even medieval castles in the vicinity. All these are relevant to the KS3 curriculum and will enable you to immerse yourself in the time period.
  1. Read about people and events that have made a difference in the world. You don’t just have to read books (Horrible Histories are good though!) but read on-line. Knowing additional factual pieces of information about the past will enable you to reinforce points and access higher grades.

 

Useful links

www.bbc.co.uk/history

www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zk26n39

www.historyonthenet.com

www.cwgc.org

 

KS3 Religious Studies

‘Rivers, ponds, lakes and streams – they all have different names, but they all contain water. Just as religions do – they all contain truths.’ – Muhammad Ali
What will I study?

You live in a world of different belief systems and values. This subject looks at fundamental questions about life, death and the purpose of our existence. It examines issues facing people in all parts of the world and helps you understand your own personal beliefs and how you might be able to influence events.

 

KS3 RE will be delivered across four half terms by your Humanities teachers:

Year Group Spring Half Term 1

– 5 lessons

Spring Half Term 2

– 6 lessons

Summer Half Term 1

– 6 lessons

Summer Half Term 2

– 7 lessons

 

 

 

 

7

Personal Belief

Looking for answers to difficult questions

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

Democracy

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

Forgiveness & Reconciliation

Applying a religious teaching to forgiveness & reconciliation

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

Democracy

The rule of law

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

Jesus of Nazareth

The meaning of Jesus’ incarnation, resurrection and teachings for Christians

 

Investigating the life and impact of a religious teacher

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

Places of Worship

Exploring the influence of beliefs on the lifestyles of believers

1c & 2a

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

Democracy

The rule of law

 

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

 

 

Year Group Spring Half Term 1

– 5 lessons

Spring Half Term 2

– 6 lessons

Summer Half Term 1

– 6 lessons

Summer Half Term 2

– 7 lessons

8 Prejudice & Discrimination

Applying religious teachings to a concept – Prejudice & discrimination

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

Democracy

The rule of law

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

Islam

Investigating the influence of beliefs, practices and worship on a believer’s lifestyle

 

Investigating the life and impact of a religious teacher – Muhammad

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

Democracy

The rule of law

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

Justice, Crime & Punishment

Applying religious teachings to a concept –  Justice, crime & punishment

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

Democracy

The rule of law

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

Rites of Passage

Birth, coming of age, marriage and death

 

Mutual tolerance

Respectful attitudes

Individual liberty

Democracy

The rule of law

 

Spiritual, moral, social & cultural development

 

How will I be assessed?

Your books will be marked regularly in line with school policy. In each unit you will be given feedback on your work and the opportunity to self/peer assess and make improvements to your work.

How can I stretch my learning?

It is important for you to get a different perspective on the big issues of life – issues such as where we come from, what happens to us after we die, why poverty and war exist in our world, and so on. To develop your understanding watch the news and current affairs programmes and discuss your views and opinions on what is going on in the world.  Speak to people about their beliefs and values and think about why people might have other contrasting viewpoints. Debating with others opens our minds to other possibilities and perspectives. It is this critical thinking and objectivity that will help you to excel in RE.

Useful links

www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zh3rkqt

www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zh3rkqt

 

GCSE Citizenship

‘As soon as any man says of the affairs of the State “What does it matter to me?” the State may be given up for lost.’ – Jean-Jacques Rousseau

 What will I study?

OCR Citizenship Studies GCSE (9-1)

Citizenship studies have been designed to enable learners to understand and appreciate key citizenship issues at home, in school and as young citizens in the wider community.

This will include topics such as:

  • Rights, the law and the legal system in the UK
  • Democracy and government
  • The UK and the wider world
  • Citizenship action

The course will enable you to deepen your knowledge of the above topics while also enabling you to think critically, evaluate evidence, debate ideas, make persuasive arguments and justify your conclusions.

 

How will I be assessed?

Pupils will sit three exams at the end of Year 11.  Papers 1 and 3 are each worth 25% of the GCSE, and Paper 2 is worth the final 50%.  The course is exam-based only; there is no controlled assessment element. However, you will be expected to take part in an ‘active citizenship’ campaign. Evidence of this campaign will be needed to be able to provide OCR with a written statement confirming your participation.

You will be regularly tested to ensure progress towards targets. They will be the completion of case study analysis and evaluations to produce extended pieces of writing on key topics. Past exam papers will be used to familiarise you with the exam format and also to gain an accurate judgement on your ability. You must engage with assessments and feedback in order to progress and improve.

Exercise books will also be marked regularly and you must respond to any feedback given.  If you miss a lesson for any reason it is your responsibility to catch up on the missing work.

How can I stretch my learning?

To develop an understanding of key Citizenship themes, you could:

  • Watch local, national and international news to keep up to date with current affairs and different viewpoints
  • Join an organisation dedicated to improving lives of people
  • Volunteer for a local help group or charity

Useful links

www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/z3ckjxs

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse-citizenship-studies-j270-from-2016/

www.bbc.co.uk/news

www.bbc.co.uk/newsround

https://www.gov.uk/volunteering/find-volunteer-placements

https://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/

www.amnesty.org.uk

www.legislation.gov.uk

www.judiciary.gov.uk

GCSE Geography

What will I study?

AQA Geography Specification A

Geography equips students with a wide range of skills that employers and higher education providers want to see in young people.  Geographers can make reports, handle data, ask questions, find answers, make decisions about important issues, analyse material, organise themselves and think creatively and independently.  Geography teaches us about people, instilling tolerance and understanding of different cultures as well as developing young people’s curiosity.  GCSE Geography is a sound base from which to progress to A Level study and beyond.

 

The GCSE curriculum offers a range of topics that appeal to different types of learners.  Both human and physical geography topics are covered in Years 9, 10 and 11 and these build on the skills and knowledge gained in Key Stage 3. Lessons are active and promote discussion and dialogue on issues that are relevant beyond ‘classroom’ geography.  Fieldwork is conducted in an urban location and a more natural environment, where students use practical research and data collection skills to collect and analyse information in the classroom in preparation for their examinations.

Paper 1: Living With the Physical Environment

  • Section A – The Challenge of Natural Hazards
  • Section B – The Living World
  • Section C – Physical Landscapes in the UK

Paper 2: Challenges of the Human Environment

  • Section A – Urban Issues and Challenges
  • Section B – The Changing Economic World
  • Section C – The Challenge of Resource Management

Paper 3: Geographical Applications and Skills

  • Issue Evaluation
  • Fieldwork
  • Geographical Skills

How will I be assessed?

You will sit three exams at the end of Year 11.  Papers 1 and 2 are each worth 35% of the GCSE, and Paper 3 is worth the final 30%.  The course is exam-based only; there is no controlled assessment element.

You will be regularly tested to ensure that you are making progress towards your targets and to ensure revision strategies and exam skills specific to Geography are in place before your final examinations.  Test questions are taken from past exam papers to make the process relevant to you and an accurate reflection of your ability.  You must engage with assessments and feedback in order to progress and improve.  Exercise books will also be marked regularly and you must respond to any feedback given.  If you miss a lesson for any reason it is your responsibility to catch up with any missing work.

How can I stretch my learning?

  • Make sure you respond to feedback given to you by your teachers and listen to advice on how to improve your work. Make sure you revise effectively for your assessments so that you are prepared to write about any aspect of your knowledge.
  • Students who read regularly, generally achieve higher in school. This is because they use the rules of spelling, punctuation and grammar more effectively and have a fuller vocabulary, meaning they can express themselves fluently.  Regular readers also structure their ideas clearly.  You may wish to look in A-Level textbooks so that you gain a more detailed and advanced knowledge of the topics that we cover in class.
  • Watch news programmes and documentaries that show the real-life implications of the geography we study in class.
  • Take part. Come to the ‘Geography Drop-In’ sessions after school and ask any questions you have and do some extra revision and exam practice.

 

Useful links

GCSE History

Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History

What will I study?

GCSE History enables you to develop and extend your knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies in local, British, and wider world history.  It encourages you to ask relevant questions about the past, to investigate issues critically and to make valid historical claims by using a range of sources in their historical context.

This subject also allows you to develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been given historical significance and how and why different interpretations about the past have developed.

We will cover four different topics during the three years, they are:

Paper 1

 

Thematic study and historic environment

Medicine in Britain, c1250–present

and

The British sector of the Western Front, 1914–18: injuries, treatment and the trenches

·      c1250–c1500: Medicine in medieval England

·      c1500–c1700: The Medical Renaissance in England

·      c1700–c1900: Medicine in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain

·      c1900–present: Medicine in modern Britain

·      Historic environments

The British sector of the Western Front, 1914–18: injuries, treatment and the trenches this is about knowledge, selection and use of sources for historical enquiries

Paper 2

 

Period study and British depth study

Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, c1060–88

 

 

 

 

Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941–91

·      Anglo-Saxon England and the Norman Conquest, 1060–66

·      William I in power: securing the kingdom, 1066–87

·      Norman England, 1066–88

·      The origins of the Cold War, 1941–58

·      Cold War crises, 1958–70

·      The end of the Cold War, 1970–91

Paper 3

 

Modern depth study

Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–39 ·      The Weimar Republic 1918–29

·      Hitler’s rise to power, 1919–33

·      Nazi control and dictatorship, 1933–39

·      Life in Nazi Germany, 1933–39

How will I be assessed?

Throughout the three year course you will be continually assessed by your teacher on GCSE practice questions which will be done in class and for homework. You will also sit regular end of unit exams in order to prepare you for your final GCSEs.  From these assessment points, targeted interventions will be undertaken in order to support you or to challenge you. Self and peer assessment just like in KS3 History will play a part in your lesson, enabling you to better engage with the success criteria.

At the end of the three years you will sit three exam papers:

  • Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment

This is a written examination lasting 1 hour and 15 minutes. This equates to 30% of your final grade.

  • Paper 2: Period study and British depth study

This is a written examination lasting 1 hour and 45 minutes. This paper will make up 40% of your final grade.

  • Paper 3: Modern depth study

This is a written examination lasting 1 hour and 20 minutes and is worth 30% of your final grade.

How can I stretch my learning?

Study history, and do additional research around the subject. If you can, add any additional knowledge you gain into your answers and put sources into context. This will impress your teachers, and any examiners. This is not just reading history books but watching films and documentaries – see your teachers for recommendations.

Remember it is not just what you know, but how you answer questions that counts. It is not enough to simply recall facts – you must become adept at finding information from sources and relating this back to knowledge about your topic. Completing past papers and GCSE questions under timed conditions is the best way to prepare for your exams. There will be revision sessions after school and at lunch in order to support you in doing this.

 

Useful links

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history

www.johndclare.net

 GCSE Religious Studies (2016-17 only)

AQA GCSE Religious Studies B – Ethics, Philosophy and Religion in Society

What will I study?

GCSE Religious Studies B encourages you to develop your interest and enthusiasm for the study of religion and the relationship between religion and the wider world. You will develop your knowledge, skills and understanding by exploring the impact of beliefs, teachings, practices and ways of life. You will be encouraged to express your personal responses and give informed insights on fundamental questions about identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments.

Pupils will study 2 units for the final exams in Y11. These are:

Unit 2: Religion & Life Issues

  • Religion & Animal Rights
  • Religion & Planet Earth
  • Religion & Prejudice
  • Religion & Early Life
  • Religion, War & Peace
  • Religion & Young People

Unit 3: Religion & Morality

  • Religious Attitudes to Matters of Life (Medical Ethics)
  • Religious Attitudes to the Elderly and Death
  • Religious Attitudes to Drug Abuse
  • Religious Attitudes to Crime and Punishment
  • Religious Attitudes to Rich and Poor in British Society
  • Religious Attitudes to World Poverty

How will I be assessed?

You will sit two 1.5 hour examinations at the end of Year 11 – each will be worth 50% of your final result.

In class you will be continually assessed through your answers to GCSE practice questions and end of unit exams. Marked work will usually include a grade, feedback on your performance and a target for improvement. Students are also encouraged to assess both their own and their peers’ work each half term.  Throughout the year your teacher will be there to support you and challenge you with differentiated material where appropriate.

How can I stretch my learning?

The more religious knowledge you use in the exam the better (but don’t just put in random, irrelevant quotes)! Therefore you need to read around the subject, engage with the news and watch relevant TV programs. Actively seek out contrasting viewpoints, because using a quote which directly contrasts with another to inform your views is a high level evaluation skill.

 

Useful links

www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zb48q6f

Key contact name, role & email

Mrs H Klee

Curriculum Leader – Humanities

hklee@shuttleworth.lancs.sch.uk

01282 682300

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