X
Menu
X

English

Shuttleworth_9.12.14-3152

English

‘The only true measure of success is the ratio between what we might have done and what we might have been on the one hand, and the things we have made and the things we have made of ourselves on the other.’ – H.G. Wells

Introduction

“English in Year 9 is highly enjoyable! We do a range of activities such as reading, writing and developing our ideas. We do lots of group work which helps us with our self-confidence and enables us to work with new people. Based on our teacher’s marking, we regularly redraft and improve our work. Also, we work independently to improve our knowledge and skills for our GCSEs.

Recently we have been studying The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare. We have read the entire script as a class and carefully analysed each key scene to answer GCSE exam style questions, as well as exploring each theme and character in detail. We feel confident to start Year 10 and can’t wait for the challenge!”

Millie Tipping & Bethani Swift – Y9

KS3 English

What will I study?

At Key Stage 3 you learn will how to enhance your use of the spoken and written word, and to develop your love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment.  Through exciting and engaging schemes of learning you will be taught to read easily, fluently and with good understanding, and will be encouraged to develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information.  You will begin to use a wider vocabulary, and develop a sound understanding of grammar.  Your knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language will also increase.  You will be taught to write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting your language and style for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences.  You will be given plenty of opportunities to develop your speaking and listening skills through discussion, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

How will I be assessed?

There are twelve formal assessments in Years 7 and 8 for English that are approximately every three weeks.  These assessments will test you on what you have been learning in class and will help you understand what you need to do to improve.  You will also have a formal end of year examination in the summer term.

How can I stretch my learning?

Most students who do well in English tend to be keen readers and writers.  If you want to improve your skills the best place to start is your reading.  Read every day and read a wide range of texts.  When reading books stretch yourself; try out authors you’ve never heard of or more difficult books that will challenge you.  Keep a dictionary close to hand so you can look up words you’re unsure of and increase your vocabulary at the same time!  To improve your writing why not keep a diary or write a blog?  There are also plenty of writing competitions online – just make sure that you check with a parent before entering.  If you’re really ambitious, why not send your writing to a local newspaper or a writer you admire for feedback?  Many do respond and it’s a good way to build up to a career in writing when you’re older.

Useful links

KS3 English Language on BBC Bitesize: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/z3kw2hv

KS3 English Literature on BBC Bitesize: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zykdmp3

GCSE English Language

What will I study?

All students work towards GCSE English Language. The programme of study encourages you to read a wide range of texts, write for specific purposes and develop speaking and listening skills. The aim is to be able to use language in a wide range of contexts in order to participate effectively in society and employment. The AQA English Language examination requires students to analyse language, explore the significance of structure and evaluate writers’ choices as well as writing creatively and with originality. You will also work to ensure that your technical accuracy helps to make your meaning and purpose clear as you develop your skills in communication, problem solving, critical thinking and working with others.

How will I be assessed?

There are regular formal assessments in Years 9, 10 and 11 for English Language that are approximately every three weeks.  These assessments will test the GCSE skills you have been developing in class and will help you understand what you need to do to improve.  They will develop your GCSE skills by using the same question stems from the Y11 GCSE examination and they will be marked using GCSE criteria. You will also have formal mock GCSE English Language examinations in Years 10 and 11.

Terminal examinations at the end of Year 11:

  • Paper One (1 hour 45) – Explorations in creative reading and writing
  • Paper Two (1 hour 45) – Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives

How can I stretch my learning?

Most students who do well in English tend to be keen readers and writers: the best place to start is your reading. What was the last thing you read?  You should aim to read every day and read a wide range of texts.  For example, why not engage with current affairs on the BBC News website? When reading try to stretch yourself; try out authors or genres you’ve never heard of or more difficult books that will challenge you.  Keep a dictionary close to hand so you can look up words you’re unsure of and increase your vocabulary at the same time.

Expressing yourself eloquently in speech is also vital: better talkers are better writers! It is an imperative for further education and beyond to the world of work.  At Shuttleworth we invite students to get involved in our Debating Club which offers fantastic opportunities for you to pit your verbal skills against students from a range of other local schools.

Useful links

GCSE English Literature

What will I study?

All students work towards GCSE English Literature alongside English Language: skills are invariably linked and lessons are therefore not separated into two subjects. The AQA GCSE English Literature specification encourages you to read a wide range of texts (plays, poems and prose), and should extend your enthusiasm for literature and how it influences the reader. You will study texts from a range of time periods, including key examination texts written before the twentieth century. This specification encourages you to explore the context in which texts are written and received therefore you will be required to complete independent research to aid your understanding of the texts. You will explore texts from different cultures and traditions, connect ideas over time and become critical readers as well as enjoying reading for pleasure. The programme of study also develops students’ skills in communication, critical thinking, working with others, and develops an appreciation of the world we live in.

At Shuttleworth you will study a selection of these texts:

Modern texts Shakespeare Poems 19th Century Novels
An Inspector Calls

Blood Brothers

Never Let Me Go

Animal Farm

Lord of the Flies

Macbeth

Romeo and Juliet

The Tempest

The Merchant of Venice

A selection of poetry exploring the theme of love (from the AQA anthology)

A range of ‘unseen’ poetry

The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

A Christmas Carol

Frankenstein

The Sign of Four

 

How will I be assessed?

There are regular formal assessments in Years 9, 10 and 11 for English Literature that are approximately every three weeks.  These assessments will test the GCSE skills you have been developing in class, as well as your knowledge of the texts and their contexts, and will help you understand what you need to do to improve.  They will develop your GCSE skills by using the same question stems from the Y11 GCSE examination and they will be marked using GCSE criteria. You will also have formal mock GCSE English Literature examinations in Years 9 and 11.

Terminal examinations at the end of Year 11:

  • Paper 1 (1 hour 45) – Shakespeare and the 19th century novel
  • Paper 2 (2 hours 15) – Modern texts and poetry

How can I stretch my learning?

Success when studying GCSE English Literature relies on a foundation of effective reading skills. In order to stretch your learning you should read additional texts by the writers you are studying, or read texts from similar contexts. Ask your teachers for suggestions; they’ll be happy to help! An understanding of the social and historical contexts will help you to be successful in the examinations so ensure that you make notes when you complete your research.

At Shuttleworth we strive to organise regular theatre trips which we will invite you and your fellow students to attend to immerse yourselves in literature. You could also go to the theatre with friends or family!

 

Useful links

GCSE Media Studies (2016-18 only)

What will I study?

The WJEC Media Studies specification is designed to allow media students to draw on their existing experience of the media and to develop their abilities to explore as well as to create media. It enables them to explore and create a wide variety of media, including digital media technologies, drawing on the fundamental concepts informing the study of the media: texts, organisations and audiences/users. These concepts are reflected in the specification’s framework for exploring and creating all media.

This specification is therefore organised in terms of the two central activities:

  • thinking about the media, involving investigating media texts and their various contexts and
  • creating for the media, involving planning, producing and presenting media texts.

Candidates will explore at least three topics for GCSE Media Studies. These topics must involve study of a minimum of three different media, including at least one print–based (magazines, newspapers, posters etc.) and one audiovisual–based form (film, television, animated film, radio music videos, websites and computer games). Each topic will be explored through the three study areas of the GCSE Media Studies framework and reflect the convergent nature of contemporary media. The topics will be assessed through external examination and controlled assessment tasks.

Topics studied, some of which may be based on particular forms, may include:

  • Music
  • Television drama
  • Advertising
  • Animation
  • Science fiction
  • Lifestyle and celebrity
  • News
  • Comedy

How will I be assessed?

Assessment for GCSE Media Studies is untiered, i.e. all components cater for the full range of ability and allow access to grades A*-G. Students will complete controlled assessment in lessons and sit a final examination in year 11.

External Assessment: Written Examination Paper (40% of the final mark)

This paper will be 2 hours 15 minutes and will include 5 minutes to read the examination paper and approximately 25 minutes to view a set audio-visual extract or to study the set print-based material. The paper is divided into two sections:

  • Section A: Thinking about the Media – Investigating will assess students on their knowledge and understanding of the set topic in relation to the main areas from the specification framework. Students will respond to stimulus material chosen by WJEC.
  • Section B: Thinking about the Media – Planning will assess students’ planning and creative skills through a series of creative tasks demonstrating an awareness of the convergent nature of contemporary media.

 Controlled Assessment (60% of the final mark)

The controlled assessment consists of:

  • Two textual investigations of 400 – 850 words or equivalent, depending on the presentational form selected (10% for each investigation)
  • One media production consisting of research, planning, the production itself and an evaluation (40%)

How can I stretch my learning?

Success when studying GCSE Media studies is reliant on the student taking an active interest in the media world around them. In order to stretch your learning you should read, observe, listen to and watch a range of different types of media and scrutinize what impact the media has on the world around you. Ask your teachers for suggestions; they’ll be happy to help! An understanding of the social and historical contexts of media development will help you to be successful in the examinations so ensure that you make notes when you complete your research.

Useful links

Key contact name, role & email

Mrs A Bury

Curriculum Leader – English

abury@shuttleworth.lancs.sch.uk

01282 682300

Tweets